Category Archives: Sports Injuries

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Safer Ski and Snowboard Tips

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‘Tis the season to hit the slopes! Skiing and snowboarding present their own unique risks to the feet and ankles. Knowledge is power; keep these things in mind when heading for the hills on your next holiday.

 

Different Sports, Different Injuries

A four-year study published by the NCBI found that there are significant differences in the types of injuries skiers and snowboarders frequently incur. Skiers are more likely to damage their knees, whereas snowboarders are more likely to injure their ankles.

 

Experience Doesn’t Necessarily Make You Safer49784833_l

According to the same study, having experience will not necessarily make you less vulnerable. For snowboarders, being new to the sport ups the risk factor. Almost half of all snowboarding injuries are sustained by newbies. The same cannot be said of skiing; less than a fifth of those injured while skiing are beginners. This means it is especially important for even advanced skiers to exercise caution.

 

Come Prepared

Make sure you are physically ready before hitting the slopes. Weak legs or core muscles, and poor endurance can make you more vulnerable to injury. The sports gear brand Evo has some great tips for how to get fit for winter sports here. Make sure you consult your physician to ensure your workout plan is an appropriate fit.

 

 

Check Your Gear, Especially Your Bindings

It is a good idea to assess all your gear regularly to make sure it is in top shape. Bindings are especially important, particularly for skiers. Bindings that fail to release are a major source of knee injuries for skiers. If at all possible, see a professional to make sure your bindings are properly adjusted, especially if you have new boots. Before heading out, a skier should do a self test to make sure your bindings will release.

 

Concerned about an old injury or dealing with a new one? Request an appointment with our team. Our foot and ankle orthopedic specialists are part of AOSMI: a medical practice, which also includes physical therapists, joint replacement profesionals, sports medicine experts, and more. Whether it is diagnosis, recovery, treatment, or adjusting your workout regime, we are happy to help!


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Common Basketball Foot and Ankle Injuries

What is the number one purchase most basketball players think about? Kicks. Jordans. Laces. Straps. Sneakers. Trainers. We think about how great our shoes look, how high they’ll help us jump, and how fast they’ll help us run. But how often do we stop and think about whether they will protect us from foot and ankle injuries on the court?

 

Even if an injury is not your first concern when you pick out new footwear for basketball, protection and safety should be a major consideration. Both chronic (long-term) and acute (traumatic) injuries to the foot and ankle are extremely common among basketball players of all ages, making up nearly 40% of all basketball-related injuries.  All that jumping, running, twisting, and stopping mean one thing to your joints–stress and trauma. These two categories of injuries have their own range of diagnoses and treatment options.

 

Chronic stress in the foot and ankle can lead to:17701478_l

 

  • Heel pain (plantar fasciitis)
  • Achilles tendonitis
  • Ankle instability
  • Sesamoiditis
  • Stress fractures
  • Posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD)
  • Calcaneal apophysitis

 

Most stress-related injuries can heal completely if treated correctly, with a combination of rest, physiotherapy, EPAT and other complementary modalities.

 

Traumatic injuries happen more suddenly and immediately, and can include fractures of the ankle, the talus (bone between the heel bone and the two bones of the lower leg), the heel, the midfoot (also known as the Lisfranc), the toes, and the forefoot. These can occur as a result of another player stepping on your foot or otherwise interfering with your forward motion, from landing wrong after a jump, or simply from losing your footing and stepping incorrectly.

 

Buying different shoes certainly isn’t the only way to prevent such injuries. Most foot and ankle injuries are indeed accidental. However, with proper training, equipment, and stretching, as well as playing in well-maintained facilities, the danger can be minimized. Request an appointment today to if you have experienced a basketball related injury or would like to learn more about preventing a sports injury this season.

 


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Foot Health For Former Dancers

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There are few sports that place more of a demand on the foot and ankle of the athlete than dancing. Ballet dancers are universally known to have regular foot injuries. New Jersey foot and ankle specialists report that a large percentage of patients with acute or chronic foot and ankle injuries are professional or competitive dancers.

 

The key to a successful dancing career? Caring for your feet. This involves warming up properly, icing your feet and ankles after a particularly grueling day of practice or performance, and recognizing the signs of common foot conditions and injuries as soon as they arise. The faster you request an appointment with a foot and ankle specialist, the less likely the injury is to derail your next performance. So what is the first step? Knowing what to look for.

 

17658316_lCommon Foot Injuries In Dancers:

  • Dancer’s Fracture: This common name for a fifth metatarsal fracture is one of the leading causes of visits to an orthopedic specialist. A Dancer’s Fracture results from a wrong landing on the foot, resulting in a fracture in the bone. Pain and swelling are usually the most noticeable symptoms.
  • Lateral Ankle Sprain: Another possible result of twisting your ankle during an awkward landing, swelling, discoloration and pain are the most common symptoms.
  • Bunions: while not a direct result of dancing, tight fitting ballet shoes can trigger these formations on the foot. Generally, the dancer can see these formations on her foot and will feel pain in the area affected.
  • Ankle Impingement Syndrome: A result of repeated stress injuries, this is the term for bones that impinge on one another and pinch the soft tissue when the dancer points his or her ankle. Dancers will often feel a sharp pain when pointing the foot.
  • Achilles Tendonitis: The result of repeated stress injuries to the foot, this is the term for chronic damage to the ankle tendons. Pain and swelling are the most common symptoms.

 

Calling an orthopedic specialist at the first sign of pain or swelling can mean the difference between competing in your next show or sitting it out because of an acute ankle injury. Call NJ Foot and Ankle today for a consultation with our team of experts.


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Ice Skating Injuries

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Ice-skating is a cherished part of many winter sports and traditions. Romantic dates, fierce hockey games, figure skating just to name a few. There are lots of reasons to check out the rink. Cold, hard, slippery ice obviously presents some serious risks. Remember to keep the following in mind this winter:

 

Most Common Injuries 12525136_l

Being aware of some of the more common kinds of ice-based injuries can help you be more cautious and understand when an injury merits immediate medical attention. There are two broad categories of injury to be mindful of: traumatic and overuse injuries.

 

Traumatic injuries are injuries caused by a single accident. Some of the more common ones include:

  • Sprains and fractures
  • Dislocated shoulder
  • ACL tears
  • Concussion or other head injury
  • Labral tears, particularly in the hip
  • Cuts and lacerations (skates are sharp!)

 

Overuse injuries are more common for athletes who spend a lot of time on the ice. Repetitive motions and strain place a lot of stress on the anatomy involved. Some of the overuse injuries commonly seen in skaters include:

  • Stress fractures, especially in the feet and spinal vertebrae
  • Shin splints
  • Tendonitis
  • Muscle strains, especially in the hip
  • Bursitis

 

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but a good place to start when understanding the general risks involved with ice-skating.

 

Avoiding Injury

Lots of the same tips we recently recommended to skiers and snowboarders apply here. If your ice skate competitively, whether as a figure skater, speed skater, or hockey player, make sure you are in shape before hitting the ice and cross train to mix things up and reduce the kind of repetitive motion and strain that leads to overuse injuries. Stay hydrated so you are alert and aware of your surroundings. Even though it’s cold and you feel like you are not sweating, you’re still using lots of water. Finally, make sure your gear is up to snuff and wear safety gear appropriate to your activity.

 

Have an ice-skating injury, or want to find a workout that will allow you to be a better skater? We’re happy to help. Request an appointment today!


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Safer Ski and Snowboard Tips

Tags : 

‘Tis the season to hit the slopes! Skiing and snowboarding present their own unique risks to the feet and ankles. Knowledge is power; keep these things in mind when heading for the hills on your next holiday.

 

24125930_l

 

Different Sports, Different Injuries

A four-year study published by the NCBI found that there are significant differences in the types of injuries skiers and snowboarders frequently incur. Skiers are more likely to damage their knees, whereas snowboarders are more likely to injure their ankles.

 

Experience Doesn’t Necessarily Make You Safer

According to the same study, having experience will not necessarily make you less vulnerable. For snowboarders, being new to the sport ups the risk factor. Almost half of all snowboarding injuries are sustained by newbies. The same cannot be said of skiing; less than a fifth of those injured while skiing are beginners. This means it is especially important for even advanced skiers to exercise caution.

 

Come Prepared

Make sure you are physically ready before hitting the slopes. Weak legs or core muscles, and poor endurance can make you more vulnerable to injury. The sports gear brand Evo has some great tips for how to get fit for winter sports here. Make sure you consult your physician to ensure your workout plan is an appropriate fit.

 

 

Check Your Gear, Especially Your Bindings

It is a good idea to assess all your gear regularly to make sure it is in top shape. Bindings are especially important, particularly for skiers. Bindings that fail to release are a major source of knee injuries for skiers. If at all possible, see a professional to make sure your bindings are properly adjusted, especially if you have new boots. Before heading out, a skier should do a self test to make sure your bindings will release.

 

Concerned about an old injury or dealing with a new one? Request an appointment with our team. Our foot and ankle orthopedic specialists are part of AOSMI: a medical practice, which also includes physical therapists, joint replacement profesionals, sports medicine experts, and more. Whether it is diagnosis, recovery, treatment, or adjusting your workout regime, we are happy to help!


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Five Ways to Avoid Sports Injuries

There are very, very few conventional sports that don’t put strain on your lower extremities. Even volleyball, tennis, and basketball involve a lot of running, leaping, and twisting. Keep these tips in mind to prevent athletic injuries.

Couple Jogging

Warm Up

Ease into your activities. On a macro level, don’t go straight from a sedentary lifestyle to boot-camp style training–start with long walks and light strengthening exercises for a reasonable amount of time–i.e. an hour each day. On a more micro level, stretch out before games, practices, and intense workouts, and ease into more intensive cardio sessions with light jogs or other low impact activities.

Stay Hydrated

You aren’t yourself when you’re dehydrated. Dehydration can cause you to feel woozy, sleepy, and nauseous–all of which in turn can impact your judgment and make you more vulnerable to injury.

Know Your Limits

Weakness, leg switching, and weak grip are all indicators of muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue is a very real condition that leaves you extremely vulnerable to injury. Think of it as your body’s emergency brake. If you are experiencing muscle fatigue, take a timeout, even if you feel like you’ve pushed through longer or more strenuous activities before.

Mix It Up

Many common injuries are caused by repetitive motion. Mix up your workouts, activities, and positions as much as possible to avoid stressing the same joints or tissues too much. Be sure to incorporate appropriate strengthening exercises into your workout routine to adequately support areas that get a lot of action or pressure.

See A Professional

If you are regularly experiencing pain or stiffness, see a professional ASAP. You may have an injury, which, left unattended could heal in a way that causes permanent deformity. Or, you may be moving in a way that doesn’t work for your current physiology. Either way, a professional can get you the treatment your need to heal existing injuries and prevent new ones.

Need help with your feet and ankles? Our experts have extensive experience treating athletes. Request an appointment here.


Twenty-six joints make up the foot and ankle, making this one of the most interesting structures in the entire body--and also, one of the most vulnerable. Injuries and pain in the foot and joint area can be debilitating, even immobilizing. Our experts are here to help you find your footing, and identify a course of treatment that will allow you to hit the ground running.